Protocols? What protocols?

I have mentioned this to a number of families over the past week, but I don’t know that I have used the world protocol more than I have this year in our return to campus.  There are so many processes and procedures in place that to ensure the safety and health of each individual; yet, I remain in wonder of our devoted faculty who have done so much to transcend the limitations placed upon their pedagogy and relationship-building in order to make the day fun, challenging, and most certainly engaging.  There are a lot of changes in our daily program, and we are constantly analyzing the way we do things in order to consider improvements and alternatives.  I think of the phrase “final draft” when considering our middle school program.  In truth, these two words are oxymorons.  There is nothing final about a draft; there is always an opportunity to enhance or adjust even the smallest component of the schedule or program to make things better for the benefit of the child(ren) we teach.

As we all negotiate the reshaping and restructuring of this school year, I recognize that there are diverse approaches to managing the inevitable (yet sometimes unforeseeable) changes.  How does your household manage change? This week, I read through an article that serves as a support to the journal and calendar that I keep (BestSelf – it’s awesome, by the way).  That journal offered an intriguing graphic on the different ways that people manage change as it appears in the day to day.

As you can see, this graphic approaches the ability to manage change based on the ability to see beyond the comfortable.  Sometimes, we find that living into the uncomfortable can get us to a level of growth far beyond imagination. The benefits for stretching into new places in order to try new things allows us to live into that best version of ourselves that my school calls confidence in every child. The ability for an individual to move “into the green” of the above graphic requires significant trust in the constructs and people that care for us. This trust, for some more than others, may be easier in a challenging assignment or project. Everyone that I know is living through their first pandemic; thus, moving “into the orange” can prove incredibly daunting. The maximum amount of trust in each other to follow those previously mentioned protocols (temperature checks at home, masks that fit properly, hand washing, social distancing whenever possible) will allow us to tiptoe into new zones of comfort and growth.  It is my hope that my school can remain a dependable place with practices that allow you and your child to come to school with confidence and a willingness to grow. I am grateful for the trust that our families have in our institution. Our team of educators continues to work hard and remain transparent with regard to changes or adjustments. We will confidently provide an innovative, fulfilling experience for each student.

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C. Gramatges

Husband to a hummingbird. Father to two tornados. Learning leader in a private school filled with excellence. Humbly following His lead.

1 Comment

  1. When you decided to go into education, you and I never imagined the obstacles you are having to face today. You are on the right track: focus on the customer (the children) and stay nimble because what worked today may not work tomorrow. I am proud of you.

    Liked by 1 person

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